PHS Announces 2011 City Gardens Contest Winners

Some secrets are too good to sit on. Such is the case for the 2011 City Gardens Contest. We’ve got the list of winners, and we can’t wait until Saturday’s reception (at the Fall Garden Festival) to share the news. Consider this your spoiler alert!

As always, the participating gardens represent a range of styles and personalities. Standouts include a garden with a grove of olive trees, and a Japanese themed container garden. Another favorite is the flower garden of Lindsay Weightman.

Here’s how one of the Contest judges described Lindsay’s garden:

Upon entering this garden, any visitor would be transported to an exotic destination. Artifacts and architectural elements add to this “World Garden.” Every bit of space has been maximized for impact and comfort. This multi-leveled garden features many different garden rooms. We especially loved the garage that had been converted into an open air, roofless dining room complete with chandelier and Southwest adobe oven.

As Jen mentioned on her Monday post, several parks received accolades. Fitler Square, Ned Wolf Park, and Gorgas Parks all earned first-prize rankings. (If you’re familiar with some of those in second place, you’ll appreciate how steep the competition is.)

New this year is a category for restaurant gardens. Three restaurants (Four Seasons Hotel, Noble American Cookery, and Paradiso) proved to have gardens as applause-worthy as their dishes.

Thanks to all who entered the contest and to all the judges. Use these links to see the complete list of winners in the Individual and Community categories.

3 thoughts on “PHS Announces 2011 City Gardens Contest Winners

  1. Pingback: Urban Garden Goddess

  2. We are happy to feature your winner as a featured blog article. Just send us the story and photos and we will run it for them. We can link back to the blog or news clips or all of the above. Great story here and nice to share in our news series – Real People with Rooftop Gardens. Just let us know.
    Good job!
    Thanks,
    Linda

  3. you really need to take the extra step of identifying the gardens so they get real recognition…. names or addresses in the place of the actual farm name dont bring any attention to all the hard work of all the people involved with the farm

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